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Carrie Burckle grew up in a new housing track subdivision in Orange County, CA. But, she has always felt strong emotional ties to her parents’ roots in Kentucky where there was time to visit with relatives sitting on the front porch swing. She loved rooting in her grandparents’ attics and basements for the trinket that had potential to tell a story. These early memories and experiences influenced her attraction to the things that are often overlooked, forgotten, and discarded. “My sketch book is full of snippets and phrases, overheard dialogues and

Carrie grew up in a new housing track subdivision in Orange County, CA. But, she has always felt strong emotional ties to her parents’ roots in Kentucky where there was time to visit with relatives sitting on the front porch swing. She loved rooting in her grandparents’ attics and basements for the trinket that had potential to tell a story. These early memories and experiences influenced her attraction to the things that are often overlooked, forgotten, and discarded. “My sketch book is full of snippets and phrases, overheard dialogues and long running lists. I find greater meaning in the physical object through this stream of consciousness.” Her work blurs the lines between traditional fiber processes and the sculptural object into richly layered, expressive, and contemplative works about the body, the marginalized, and the overlooked in a society that craves the new, the fast and the cheapest. Carrie received her BFA in Textile Design from California State University Long Beach. She did post graduate work at the Appalachian Center for Crafts in TN. She received her MFA from California State University Long Beach where she received the Distinguished Creative Achievement Award from the College of the Arts, She has been an instructor in the Fiber program at CSULB since 2002 where she taught weaving, surface design and dyeing, pattern design and screen printing and fiber sculpture.

Cameron Taylor-Brown has immersed herself in the worlds of textiles and education since the 1970s. She studied fiber art at the University of California, Berkeley with artist Ed Rossbach and textile design at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science. She worked in New York City as a stylist of home furnishing fabrics, taught textile design at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science and worked as an exhibition curator while at the college.  Since 1985, Taylor-Brown has lived in Los Angeles where she maintains a studio and is active in several arts organizations. She is a board member of the Fowler Textile Council, was a founding board member of the Textile Group of Los Angeles, and is a past President of California Fibers and Designing Weavers. In 2010 she founded ARTSgarage, a textile resource center in Los Angeles. Her work is widely exhibited and is featured in publications including American Craft Magazine, Fiber Art Now and Shuttle, Spindle and Dyepot. She teaches textile workshops at schools, guilds, museums and conferences throughout the United States and Canada and in Los Angeles at ARTSgarage. 

Lori Zimmerman is an artist working in the Los Angeles area. She is interested in the beauty and pain inherent in aging, the subtle coloring of flora and nature’s expert patterning. Her work incorporates painting, photography, collage and freestyle hand embroidery on fabric and paper. Lori graduated from California College of Art with a BFA in Craft and worked in textile and interior design. After graduating from USC with an MBA Lori started a career in nonprofit management working in community and arts organizations. She returned to her art practice in 2009.

Lori has exhibited her work at throughout the United States and Canada including Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA (2016); Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Gatlinburg, TN (2015); Ventura Government Center, Ventura, CA (2015); The Loft at Liz’s, Los Angeles CA (2015, 2013, 2012); Academy of Jewish Religion, Los Angeles, CA (2014), Soka University Founder’s Hall Art Gallery, Aliso Viejo CA (2014); Visions Art Museum, San Diego, CA (2014); Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts Logan Gallery, Ojai CA (2014);Craft in America Study Center, Los Angeles CA (2013); The World of Threads Festival, Oakville, Ontario, Canada (2012); Edward Cella Art & Architecture, Los Angeles CA (2011;) and Yarn Bomb, 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica CA (2011)

Mary Beth Schwartzenberger, I started my artistic life as a photography major at Columbia College in Chicago. One day I walked into a room with floor looms and became captivated. Weaving brought me into the world of fiber and I have never left.  For me as an artist, it had everything that made sense to me; work of the hand, a communal excitement for the craft and a playground for color and texture. Throughout the years, my medium has changed, but I maintain my connection to fiber as a tool to bring texture to my work. The artwork I am producing today is a unique fusion of 2 medias, paint and fiber. Each piece is a translation of my love of nature, color and texture and is presented as framed work for interiors.

As the years have gone by, my work has gotten more abstract.  It is now more about tapping into the viewer’s imagination than me providing the image.  That is the power of abstract expressionism for me.  It allows the viewers to recall places, emotions, and experiences.  I like when each person sees something different.  For me, that defines a successful piece, because my thoughts are out of the way. The door has been opened for the viewer to experience the work and transform it into their personal journey. 

Michael Rohde works are the result of a process that starts with a question: “What if?” Subtle changes in color and yarn create works that become meditative objects that delight the eye and capture the imagination. He is inspired by color, by geometry and the unpredictable nature of color relationships. Seeing him at work, seated at a large loom, recalls an image of an organist exploring the intricacies of a Bach fugue. Michael has been weaving for more than thirty years. He was trained as a bio-chemist and for a number of years pursued a science career while at the same time becoming increasingly curious about how various yarns behaved on the loom, and how slight variations in dyes could create a different emotional and aesthetic impact. About 10 years ago, he began to dedicate himself only to weaving. His success is witnessed by the numerous awards he has received and by exhibitions in this country and abroad. His work is in the permanent collection of The Art Institute of Chicago.